Bienvenidos a Bolivia!

All four of us from Amizade were on the same plane to La Paz, and we ended up meeting each other in line for immigration and customs. All of us were unsure about what to expect while actually entering into Bolivia. Even though my Spanish is pretty good, I was really hoping the immigration and customs officers spoke English; they never spoke a word of English to me. I had to use my Spanish skills right from the beginning.

Read this →

Day of Pedestrians

Bolivia is celebrating the beginning of spring. In Cochabamba, the snow is melting from the peaks of the surrounding Andes mountains. The jacaranda trees in plazas, gardens and streets throughout the city are sprouting vivid purple blossoms that frame the sky. Later, the blossoms will drift lazily down to the ground to form carpets of rich purple. Bolivian children are tingling with the anticipation of freedom – schools will let out for summer vacation by late November or early December. So it is the perfect time to celebrate the Dia de Peatones.

Read this →

Kampala, A Bustling City

Our hotel is a nice respite from the chaos that is center city, Kampala. We have ventured into the heart of the city twice now, and even the students admit it is difficult to explain the experience in words only. People are everywhere, vehicles are everywhere (on the road, on the sidewalks, in the shoulders), and there is much to take in. Personally, I will feel much more at home in Karagwe where the most common sounds are those of farm animals… cows, goats, chickens, the lone roaster crying to wake up everyone when the sun rises.

Read this →

Traveling in East Africa… A Typical Journey

Yesterday was our big day of travel from the Karagwe district of Tanzania to Uganda’s capitol, Kampala. Travel in East Africa is typically exhilarating, scary, frustrating, and cause for great laughter all wrapped in the same journey, and rest-assured our day did not disappoint.

Read this →

The Only Mzungo in Running Shorts

We have been staying at The Mavuno Project compound for 12 days now and have become used to the amenities, pit latrines, cold showers, three square meals prepared by Mama Kennedy, and the occasional howling at 2:30 a.m. from the local dogs. Staying at the Mavuno compound with us are three individuals. Two are from Germany, and the other is from South Africa. It has been nice to interact with other visitors on a regular basis and to share stories and experiences that cover three continents. Their time here is short but their work is very important. All three individuals are in some fashion working with Mavuno on the Water tank projects.

Read this →