Stories from Karagwe: Karibu Chakula (Welcome to the Food)

Have you ever wondered where your food comes from? Do you know the farmers who grow it or the chef who cooks it? When going to a restaurant in the United States, one rarely has the chance to meet the chef or see the kitchen. Knowing the farmer who sweat over the crops which make up that meal has also become increasingly difficult in our complicated consumer economy. I do not know if I will ever have a relationship with a chef or farmer at home and as clearly see where my food is coming from, like I do here.

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Stories from Karagwe:There and back again: A Tale of Water and Fire

March 18th was a beautiful morning with sun and a cool breeze. Seven students and two teachers climbed into a boat heading to an island off the Bukoban coast to visit the burial site of ancient kings. What they were not aware of however, was how this boat ride would be like nothing they would be prepared for. As the long, wooden fishing boat set off from the coast a line of swirling black clouds approached at high speed.

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Silvia and Ceoli

I don’t know how she does it alone. Silvia, the doctor I have the pleasure of working with this semester, is a 25-year-old native of Cochabamba, Bolivia who loves working with the children at Ceoli; her passion for her job is evident in her interactions with the children. Her weakness is she only has two hands. With nearly 200 children who are constantly sick or hurting themselves as well as in need of basic regular medical care she needs another set or two of hands.

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Stories from Karagwe: Ninaitwa Joyce na ninatoka Marekani

Be it funeral, wedding, or Sunday service, every time I enter a church, a silence sweeps the crowd as all eyes turn to stare. More than a few “mzungu ” (white person) are uttered under breaths as the ushers scramble to make sure I get a real chair and not a bench off to the side but in the front so that I’m visible to all.

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Sports Day!

Today was Sport’s Day! All of us went to the Galloway ECI to support the kids. I was excited for them because I had been watching them train all week. All of them were clad and shining I their team colors. The students raced to see who could count correctly and write their names the fastest. Unfortunately team yellow did not win. It seemed every child’s parent came out to cheer them on. It was a big local event. People were selling candy and water. Parents and relatives were yelling at the little athletes to run faster.

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March 29, 2012

March 29, 2012 Today was an extremely interesting day to say the least. The day was full of a variety…

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Volunteering and Learning at Galloway ECI, Jamaica

Today I spent my second day volunteering at Galloway ECI, a preschool for ages 3-5. The children were so wonderful and friendly! The school day starts with a neat time called “devotion”. A few of the students , assisted by a teacher, lead religious songs and the Jamaican national anthem, recite courtesy words like “please” and “thank you”, and name the parishes of Jamaica.

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Stories from Karagwe: Kara on Religion

Most secular study abroad programs do not have regular discussions about religion. Our group consists of diverse religious believers in a country where asking about religion often comes before learning someone else’s name.

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Stories From Karagwe: part 1

Two weeks ago, we – a group of 8 students from universities across the United States—arrived in Kampala, Uganda. Each of us carrieda different story of how we found ourselves half-way across the world. As we have moved to our new home in rural Tanzania, our stories have begun to weave together, and we continue to braid in the new strands of all the people we meet.

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