Navajo Nation

Serve and learn in the Navajo Nation. The cultural home to the Navajo people, and a place marked with beautiful sandstone mesas, towering buttes, colorful canyons, and dramatic desert scenery.

 Amizade has partnered in the Navajo Nation since 1998. It is the largest of the Indian Reservations in the US extending over four states – Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, and Colorado. The Navajo people share rich cultural traditions and are well known for their contributions to the world at large, including the role of the Navajo Code Talkers in WWII and their exquisite artistry. Current challenges include maintaining cultural identity, educating their children, and economic development.

OPPORTUNITIES

Programs focus on cross cultural understanding.

SHORT TERM & CUSTOMIZED

NAVAJO NATION TEAM

KEY THEMES

The main themes associated with our programs in the Navajo Nation.

• Construction & Maintenance
• Cultural Heritage & Traditions
• Slavery & Colonialism
• Indigenous Communities

HEALTH & SAFETY

As you or your loved one prepares to serve with Amizade in the Navajo Nation, you can rest comfortably with the knowledge that Amizade has an exceptionally strong safety record and ability to respond to any emerging challenges.

RESOURCES

The Basics

Review the Amizade Navajo Nation Site Handbook.

Recommended Reading

Adkins, Adam (1997). Secret War: The Navajo Code Talkers in World War IINew Mexico Historical Review, October 1997

Begay, R. (2001). Doo dilzin da: Abuse of the natural worldAmerican Indian Quarterly, 25(1), 21-27.

Benedek, E. (1995). My Mom Always Says, ‘Never Trust a White Person’. In Beyond the Four Corners of the World: A Navajo Woman’s Journey. Random House.

Johansen, B. E. (1994). The High Cost of Uranium in Navajoland. Excerpted from Ecocide of Native America: Environmental Destruction of Indiana Lands and Peoples, by Donald A. Grinde, Jr., and Bruce E. Johansen. Santa Fe: Clear Light Publishers, 1994.

Lee, Lloyd L. (2007). The future of Navajo nationalism. Wicazo Sa Review 22.1 (2007) 53-68

Lee, Lloyd L. (2008). Reclaiming indigenous intellectual, political, and geographic space. A path for Navajo nationhoodAmerican Indian Quarterly, 32(1)

McCloskey, J. (1998). Three generations of Navajo women. American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 22(2).

McPherson, R. (1998). Navajo livestock reduction in Southeastern Utah, 1933-1946: History repeats itselfAmerican Indian Quarterly, 22(1-2), 1-18.

Schwartz, M. T. (1997). Unraveling the anchoring cord: Navajo relocation, 1974-1996. American Anthropologist, 99(1), 43-55.

Tohe, L. (2000). There is no word for feminism in my languageWicazo Sa Review: A Journal of Native American Studies, 15(2), 103-110.

Tohe, L. (2007). Hwéeldi Bééhániih: Remembering the Long WalkWicazo Sa Review: A Journal of Native American Studies, 22(1), 77-82.

Yazzie, R. (1994). Life Comes From It: Navajo justice conceptsNew Mexico Law Review: Indian Law Symposium, 24(2), 175-190.

Alexie, S. (2007). The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian. Little, Brown.

Yazzie, R. (1994). Life comes from it: Navajo justice concepts. The Ecology of Justice (IC#38) pg. 29

Nielsen, O. Marianne and Zion, W James (2005). Navajo Nation Peacemaking. Living Traditional Justice The University of Arizona Press, Tucson.

Recommended Viewing

Broken Rainbow (highly recommended for all participants to watch before visiting the Navajo Nation!)

How the West Was Lost: the Navajo

Morgan Spurlock: 30 Days: Life on an Indian Reservation (on Netflix)

Homeland: Segment on uranium mining in the Navajo

Websites

Navajo Times

CrownpointTuba City and Mariano Lake Chapter websites

Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Stay Engaged! 

Global Citizen Resource Guide

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